The Koli people are an ethnic Indian group in Rajasthan, Himachal Pradesh, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Karnataka and Jammu and Kashmir states. The term has been used to represent at least four subcastes, being those of the Kachhis, Kachwahas, Koeris and Muraos. "[2], The relevance of the kshatriya label in terms of ritual was diminished by the practical actions of the KKGKS which, among other things, saw demands for the constituent communities to be classified as Backward Classes in the Indian scheme for positive discrimination. Fuller, Christopher John (Winter 1975), "The Internal Structure of the Nayar Caste", Articles containing potentially dated statements from 2004, All articles containing potentially dated statements, Articles containing potentially dated statements from 2012, Articles containing potentially dated statements from 2001, Pages containing links to subscription-only content, Commons category template with no category set, Commons category without a link on Wikidata, Akhil Bhartiya Yuva Koli/Kori Samar Organisation, Plants and animals important to the Koli-Agri community in Maharashtra on. [1], The Kolis of Gujarat intermixed with Rajputs due to the practice of hypergamous marriage,[2] which was commonly used to enhance or secure social status as, for example, with the Nairs and Nambudiri Brahmins of Kerala. The Meena is a tribe found mainly in the Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh regions of India. Kshatriyas would not usually wish to be associated with such a category and indeed it runs counter to the theory of Sanskritisation, but in this instance, it suited the socio-economic and political desires. Are you certain this article is inappropriate? [9], The Government of India classified the Koli community as Scheduled Caste in the 2001 census for the states of Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan. google_ad_width = 160; [7], The relevance of the Kshatriya label in terms of ritual was diminished by the practical actions of the KKGKS which, among other things, saw demands for the constituent communities to be classified as Backward Classes in the Indian scheme for positive discrimination. Some do not refer to themselves as Koli at all. [1], The Kolis of Gujarat intermixed with Rajputs due to the practice of hypergamous marriage,[2] which was commonly used to enhance or secure social status . The Rajputs were politically, economically and socially marginalised because their own numbers — around 4 - 5 per cent of the population — were inferior to the dominant Patidars, with whom the Kolis were also disenchanted. Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002. The use of the word Kshatriya was largely tactical and the original caste identity was seriously diluted." [ citation needed ]. Für die in Goa gefundene ethnische Gruppe siehe Kharvi. AJGAR was a suggested alliance of the Ahir, Jat, Gurjar and Rajput castes. The Kashyap are a caste in India. Gurjar or Gujjar is an ethnic agricultural and pastoral community of India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. "[2], The relevance of the kshatriya label in terms of ritual was diminished by the practical actions of the KKGKS which, among other things, saw demands for the constituent communities to be classified as Bhils, with the Kolis in the middle. [2], In 1947, around the time that Christophe Jaffrelot, a historian and political scientist, says that this body, which claimed to represent the Rajputs and Kolis, "... is a good example of the way castes, with very different ritual status, join hands to defend their common interests. The Kolis were among those whom the Rajputs targeted because, although classified as a criminal tribe by the British administration, they were among the many communities of that period who had made genealogical claims of descent from the kshatriya. Patidar is an Indian landlord and agrarian caste found mostly in Gujarat but also in at least 22 other states of India. The other land-based Koli are chiefly concerned with agriculture. It was also seeking alliances with political parties at the state level; initially, with the Indian National Congress and then, by the early 1960s, with the Swatantra Party. At present, some of the largest Koli communities reside in Southern Gujarat, including Surat, Navsari and Valsad, as well as in North Western Maharashtra, especially Mumbai. Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles. The Koli people are an ethnic Indian group in Rajasthan, Himachal Pradesh, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Karnataka and Jammu and Kashmir states. [2], In 1947, around the time that India gained independence, the Kutch, Kathiawar, Gujarat Kshatriya Sabha (KKGKS) caste association emerged as an umbrella organisation to continue the work begun during the Raj. The Koli … The Kolis were among those whom the Rajputs targeted because, although classified as a criminal tribe by the British administration, they were among the many communities of that period who had made genealogical claims of descent from the kshatriya. By 1967, the KKGKS was once again working with Congress because, despite being a haven for Patidars, the party leadership needed the votes of the KKGKS membership. It is not to be confused with, "Jammu and Kashmir BJP in favour of reservation for people living along international border", "Koli community hopeful of getting ST tag in Karnataka - Times of India", "Central List of OBCs for the State of Gujarat", "As NDA cadet, I was witness to Vice Admiral Awati's kindness", "Mumbai: BJP rallies around fishermen opposing coastal road project", "Koli leader Parshottam Solanki skips cabinet meeting, ups ante - Times of India", Plants and animals important to the Koli-Agri community in Maharashtra. [8] There were significant differences in status throughout the Koli community, however, and little cohesion either geographically or in terms of communal norms, such as the establishment of endogamous marriage groups. Script error: The function "getCommonsLink" does not exist. For the Indian weaving community called Kori, see, "Thakor" redirects here. [12] Their many Jātis include the Bareeya, Khant and Thakor, and they also use Koli as a suffix, giving rise to groups such as the Gulam Koli and Matia Koli. This term was made popular by Indian sociologist M. N. Srinivas in the 1950s. In Mumbai, Native Christians include Koli East Indian Catholics, who were converted by the Portuguese during the 16th century. The largest groups of Koli live in the state of Maharashtra, especially in Mumbai, and in Gujarat state. /* 160x600, created 12/31/07 */ google_ad_client = "pub-2707004110972434"; [13], As of 2012 [update] , various communities bearing the Koli name appear in the central lists of Other Backward Classes maintained by the National Commission for Backward Classes, although at least one is also in part recognised as a Scheduled Tribe. It was first proposed by Sir Chhotu Ram, a rural leader and politician in pre-independence India as a form of peasant-alliance. These classifications have been in force since at least 1993. [10][11][12], Ahmedabad, Maharashtra, Rajasthan, Gujarati language, Surat, Mumbai, Marathi literature, Bal Gangadhar Tilak, Varkari, Marathi language, Delhi, Lucknow, Uttarakhand, Varanasi, Hindi, Delhi, Chandigarh, Rajasthan, Gurgaon, Faridabad, Buddhism, Gautama Buddha, Śīla, Pali Canon, Pali, Maharashtra, Marathi language, Mumbai, Koli people, Kerala, India, Koli people, Khukhrain, Khatri, Punjab (India), Mumbai, India, Maharashtra, Thane, Ulhasnagar,